Towards a Healthier Canada – Data TableFootnote i

Monitoring the many factors that influence childhood obesity/healthy weights helps to inform and identify actions to support positive change. As a result, Federal, Provincial and Territorial governments, alongside experts from across the country, agreed on a set of national indicators Footnote ii to report on every two years. These indicators provide information on healthy weights, physical activity and healthy eating, as well as information on the physical and social environments in which children and families live, learn and play.Footnote iii

The current progress report provides the third update of the indicators on childhood obesity, and its determinants, in Canada.

The 2017 e-Report includes revised indicators for ‘Level of physical activity’, ‘Sedentary behaviour (screen time)’ and ‘Adequate sleep,’ in order to be consistent with the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and YouthFootnote iv, released in 2016, which replace Canada’s previous physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines for children and youth, and provide the first Canadian sleep recommendations for children and youth.

Towards a Healthier Canada – Data Table
Topic Indicator Measure e-Report 2013
(Data Source)
e-Report 2015
(Data Source)
e-Report 2017
(Data Source)
Data source abbreviations: CHMS (Canadian Health Measures Survey), HBSC (Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children, Student and Administrator Surveys), PAM (Physical Activity Monitor), CCHS (Canadian Community Health Survey), CANPLAY (Canadian Physical Activity Levels Among Youth Survey).

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Most recent data as of June 2017.

Return to footnote i referrer

Footnote 2

Data sources for Indigenous populations: Indicators presented in this report apply to our population as a whole. It is well known that subgroups of the population (e.g. Indigenous peoples) experience poorer health status compared to the general population.  Limitations in current national data sources, including the exclusion of First Nations populations living on reserve from all surveys above, and the exclusion of populations living in Canada’s territories (CCHS 2015, CHMS) and/or certain remote regions (CCHS, CHMS) in which a large proportion of Inuit live, limit the representativeness of Indigenous populations in these surveys. The Pan-Canadian Public Health Network continues to examine data sources for culturally appropriate healthy weights indicators for Indigenous peoples and will provide an update on this work in the 2019 progress report.

Return to footnote ii referrer

Footnote 3

The indicators and data sources included in the 2013, 2015 and 2017 e-Reports, were selected based on evidence and advice from a Task Group comprised of F/P/T officials and experts across the country. It should be noted that these indicators and data sources may require modification over the coming years (e.g. due to changing data sources).

Return to footnote iii referrer

Footnote 4

Tremblay MS, Carson V, Chaput JP, Connor Gorber S, Dinh T, Duggan M, et al. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2016 Jun;41(6 Suppl 3):S311-27.

Return to footnote iv referrer

Footnote 5

Estimates using the HBSC survey, which is updated every 4 years, could not be updated for the 2015 e-Report given that more recent data is not available.

Return to first footnote v referrer

Footnote 6

Statistically significant change between 2015 and 2017 e-Report estimates.

Return to first footnote vi referrer

Footnote 7

This is a revised indicator.  The previous indicator was revised to reflect the recommendations found within the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth.

Return to first footnote vii referrer

Footnote 8

This estimate was NOT presented in the 2013 e-report. It reflects the estimate for this revised indicator using data from the same data year as that presented in the 2013 report.

Return to first footnote viii referrer

Footnote 9

This estimate was NOT presented in the 2015 e-report. It reflects the estimate for this revised indicator using data from the same data year as that presented in the 2015 report.

Return to first footnote ix referrer

Footnote 10

This estimate was NOT presented in the 2013 e-report. It reflects a correction to the previously reported data.

Return to first footnote x referrer

Footnote 11

This estimate was NOT presented in the 2015 e-report. It reflects a correction to the previously reported data.

Return to first footnote xi referrer

Footnote 12

Differences in estimates for the 2013 and 2015 e-Reports are likely due to changes in the survey questions.

Return to first footnote xii referrer

Footnote 13

This estimate is NOT nationally representative.  Only data from NS, NB, QC, ON, AB, NT and NU were collected on breastfeeding in 2013.

Return to first footnote xiii referrer

Footnote 14

This estimate is NOT nationally representative. Data from the territories was not collected as part of the 2015 CCHS. Additionally, due to a major redesign of the CCHS in 2015, caution should be taken when comparing data from CCHS 2015 to previous cycles.

Return to first footnote xiv referrer

Footnote 15

Due to significant changes in the survey questions used to report on this indicator in CCHS2015, data from CCHS 2014 are presented in this table for comparability with previous reports.

Return to footnote xv referrer

Footnote 16

As reported in: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute. 2010 Physical Activity Monitor - Bulletin 08: Availability, use, and suitability of public facilities and programs. Ottawa: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, 2011.

Return to footnote xvi referrer

Footnote 17

Interim data.

Return to first footnote xvii referrer

Footnote 18

At the time of writing (the 2017 e-Report on Healthy Weights), the Government of Canada was advancing commitments on marketing to children, including the identification of indicators. As such, a baseline value for the exposure to TV ads will be provided in the 2019 e-Report on Healthy Weights.

Return to footnote xviii referrer

Footnote 19

As reported in: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute. 2010 Physical Activity Monitor - Bulletin 07: Parental Involvement in Children’s Physical Activity. Ottawa: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, 2011.

Return to footnote xix referrer

Footnote 20

Estimates using the CCHS could not be updated for this measure given that more recent data is not available for all jurisdictions.

Return to first footnote xx referrer

Footnote 21

As reported in: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute. 2008 Physical Activity Monitor: Getting Kids Active! - Bulletin 03: Barriers to physical activity among children. Ottawa: Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, 2009.

Return to footnote xxi referrer

Footnote 22

This indicator represents an estimate of unhealthy food and beverage ads targeted to children and youth on their 10 most popular websites. As reported in: Heart & Stroke. The kids are not alright: How the food and beverage industry is marketing our children and youth to death. 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians. Ottawa: Heart & Stroke, 2017.

Return to footnote xxii referrer

Healthy Weights Overweight prevalence Proportion of children (aged 5-17 years) who are overweight (measured Body Mass Index (BMI), World Health Organization (WHO) cut-offs) 19.8%

(CHMS 2009-11)
18.6%

(CHMS 2012-13)
17.2%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Obesity prevalence Proportion of children (aged 5-17 years) who are obese (measured BMI, WHO cut-offs) 11.7%

(CHMS 2009-11)
12.5%

(CHMS 2012-13)
13.1%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Physical Activity Active play Proportion of children (aged 6-11) who accumulate less than 3 hours per week of active play (unstructured physical activity) outside of school 49.0%

(CHMS 2009-11)
54.8%

(CHMS 2012-13)
52.1%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Active transportation Proportion of children (aged 11-15) who use active travel as their main form of transportation to school 32.5%

(HBSC 2009-10)
32.5%Footnote v 25.6%Footnote vi

(HBSC 2014)
Level of physical activity Proportion of children  and youth (aged 5-17) that meet physical activity recommendations from the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines by accumulating at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per dayFootnote vii 32.2%Footnote viii

(CHMS 2009-11)
42.2%Footnote ix

(CHMS 2012-13)
37.6%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Step counts:  Proportion of children (aged 5-17) who attain at least 12000 steps per day 7.0%

(CANPLAY 2009-11)
5.4%

(CANPLAY 2011-14)
7.0%

(CANPLAY 2014-15)
Organized sport Average number of hours per week that children (aged 6-11) take part in physical activity, outside of school while participating in lessons or league or team sports 1.9 hoursFootnote x

(CHMS 2009-11)
2.0 hoursFootnote xi

(CHMS 2012-13)
2.0 hours

(CHMS 2014-15)
Sedentary behaviour (Screen time) Proportion of children and youth (aged 3-17) who exceed recommendations for screen time from the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines (i.e. more than 2 hours/day for ages 5-17 and more than 1 hour for children aged 3-5)Footnote vii 54.9%

(CHMS 2009-11)
74.5%Footnote xii

(CHMS 2012-13)
73.1%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Sedentary pursuits after school Average number of minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) obtained by children (aged 6-19) between the hours of 3 pm and 5 pm 9.8 minutes

(CHMS 2007-09)
9.6 minutes

(CHMS 2012-13)
9.2 minutes

(CHMS 2014-15)
Healthy Eating Breakfast consumption Proportion of children (aged 11-15) who report eating breakfast on weekdays, 5 days/week 58.6%

(HBSC 2009-10)
58.6% 59.5%

(HBSC 2014)
Breastfeeding Proportion of women (aged 15 and over) who report initiating breastfeeding at the birth of their child 89.3%

(CCHS 2011-12)
91.1%Footnote xiii

(CCHS 2013)
90.3%Footnote xiv

(CCHS 2015)
Proportion of women (aged 15 and over) who report exclusive breastfeeding to their child for the first six months of life 24.1%

(CCHS 2011-12)
27.6%Footnote xiii

(CCHS 2013)
31.5%Footnote vi,Footnote xiv

(CCHS 2015)
Fruit and vegetable consumption Proportion of children (aged 12-17) reporting that they consumed fruit or vegetables at least five times per day 45.5%

(CCHS 2011-12)
43.9%

(CCHS 2013)
44.6%Footnote xv

(CCHS 2014)
Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption Proportion of children (aged 3-17) who report drinking soft drinks, fruit drinks or sport drinks every day 24.0%

(CHMS 2009-11)
16.4%Footnote xii

(CHMS 2012-13)
14.7%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Supportive Environment Adequate sleep Proportion of children (aged 5-17) obtaining adequate sleep, as recommended by the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines: 9-11 hours for children aged 5-13 years, 8-10 hours for children aged 14-17 yearsFootnote vii 73.6  %Footnote viii

(CHMS 2009-11)
75.3 %Footnote ix

(CHMS 2012-13)
70.7%

(CHMS 2014-15)
Built environment Proportion of parents of children aged 5-17 who report the availability and adequacy of local public facilities and programs for physical activity and sports for their children 93.0% say public facilities & programs are available;
65% say these facilities/ programs meet their needsFootnote xvi

(PAM 2010)
92.0% say public facilities & programs are availableFootnote xvii

(PAM 2014-15Footnote xvii)
94.9% say public facilities & programs are available-

(PAM 2014-15)
Exposure of Canadian children to unhealthy food and beverage marketing Number of unhealthy food and beverage ads targeted to children on TV (Nielsen Data) n/a n/a TBCFootnote xviii
Number of unhealthy food and beverage ads targeted to children on the internet n/a n/a 22.5 million (aged 2-11);
2.25 million (aged 12-17)Footnote xxii

(comScore
June 2015-May 2016)
Family recreation Proportion of Canadian parents who report 'often' or 'very often' playing active games with their children in the past year 37.0%Footnote xix

(PAM 2010)
38.0% Footnote xvii

(PAM 2014-15Footnote xvii)
36.1%

(PAM 2014-15)
Food insecurity Proportion of households, with at least one child under the age of 18, considered food insecure 10.0%

(CCHS 2011-12)
10.0%Footnote xx

(CCHS 2011-12)
10.0%Footnote xx

(CCHS 2011-12)
Physical education Average number of hours per week of physical activity obtained by children (aged 6 to 11) during class time 2.1 hoursFootnote x

(CHMS 2009-11)
1.7 hoursFootnote xi

(CHMS 2012-13)
2.0 hours

(CHMS 2014-15)
Safety Proportion of Canadian parents who identify safety concerns as a barrier to children’s physical activity 18.0%Footnote xxi

(PAM 2010)
24.0%Footnote xvii

(PAM 2014-15Footnote xvii)
24.0%

(PAM 2014-15)
Proportion of youth (aged 11-15) who agree or strongly agree that it is safe for younger children to play outside during the day 75.3%

(HBSC 2009-10)
75.3%Footnote v

(HBSC 2009-10)
79.6%Footnote vi

(HBSC 2014)
Supportive policies, programs and facilities at school Proportion of schools that have a committee that oversees policies and practices concerning physical activity or healthy eating (e.g., health action team) 62.5%

(HBSC 2009-10)
62.5%Footnote v

(HBSC 2009-10)
50.8%

(HBSC 2014)
Proportion of schools with an improvement plan for the current school year containing any items related to physical activity or healthy eating 60.2%

(HBSC 2009-10)
60.2%Footnote v

(HBSC 2009-10)
50.5%

(HBSC 2014)